Why Martin Luther Wrote Nintey Five Thesis

Why Martin Luther Wrote Nintey Five (95) Thesis

People who start off their search for why did Martin Luther write The 95 Theses are led down the road that talks about the reasons why Martin Luther wrote the 95 theses and this road then splits up in to little diversions and alleys that delve in to issues such as did Martin Luther nail his 95 theses, did Martin Luther post his 95 theses or why did Martin Luther create the 95 theses, why did Martin Luther copy the 95 theses, why did Martin Luther save the 95 theses etc.

Inspiration Behind The Ninety Five Theses

So now I try to explain the question that starts this investigation frenzy; why did Martin Luther write the 95 theses? Martin Luther lived during the 16th century, was a priest from the lands of Germany which at that point in time fell within the realm of the Holy Roman Empire and is dubbed the father of the Protestant Reformation. It all started when a friar of Dominican ancestry by the name of Johann Tetzel was by the Roman Catholic Church to Germany in a bid to raise funds for the renovation of the Rome based St. Peter’s Basilica by selling indulgences; the mission embarking commencing in 1516. Come the 31st day of October the next annum in 1517 and Martin Luther would write to the Archbishop of Mainz & Magdeburg – Albrecht – objecting to the selling of indulgences; his intention being to merely question the nature of the church practices at the time rather than confronting the entire institution.

Tone of The 95 Theses

Even historians have noted that the tone of his letter (The 95 Thesis) was not one that looked to doctrine but rather one that seeks and searches for the truth. This notion is supported by the 86th theses that asked why did the Pope – who was extremely wealthy and had ample personal assets of his own – have to ask the poor for funds for the reconstruction and why did he not present his own assets for the good cause. Martin Luther’s simple claim was that forgiveness could not be bought through monetary assets but had to be asked for from God Himself.

  • Marae

    according to my understanding on this topic, I found that the theses of Martin Luther was not a doctrine but He search for the truth. that means he did not want to form another church but to correct the error he saw in that church.But why did people said that he was the founder of the Lutheran Church??

  • Anonymous

    It’s true that he aspired to bring the Christian faith back in line with the original teachings and doctrines. However, his efforts led to the formation of a smaller faction of believers that came to be known as the Lutherans

  • Anonymous

    i hav no idea can you please just answer why he posted them ??

  • Karl

    Marae: The Church was even more political (and tied to the State) than it was today. Remember the “Divine Right of King” concept. Luther (who had is Ph.D. by the way)was concerned for his people as well as his own person salvation. At the Diet of Worms (Worms being a city in Germany) he was told to explain himself, and eventually to recant. This led to his “Here I Stand” statement saying he could not recant God’s Truth. Politics, again: certain German Princes put Luther under their protection since, as a result of all this, Luther was excommunicated and a wanted/hunted man. Luther’s advisers convinced him the only way to correct the errors was to “reform”, vis-a-vis, start a new church. So while Luther did not go in wanting a reformation, change of events brought him to that end.

  • http://www.writeAwriting.com Ozzy

    I love the way how you hit upon those events in a sequential manner Karl. Thanks for your input =)

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    Karl:

    Marae: The Church was even more political (and tied to the State) than it was today. Remember the “Divine Right of King” concept. Luther (who had is Ph.D. by the way)was concerned for his people as well as his own person salvation. At the Diet of Worms (Worms being a city in Germany) he was told to explain himself, and eventually to recant. This led to his “Here I Stand” statement saying he could not recant God’s Truth. Politics, again: certain German Princes put Luther under their protection since, as a result of all this, Luther was excommunicated and a wanted/hunted man. Luther’s advisers convinced him the only way to correct the errors was to “reform”, vis-a-vis, start a new church. So while Luther did not go in wanting a reformation, change of events brought him to that end.

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  • jerrica

    wow i really like how u recaped on every thing

  • Barny Knelsen

    To bad he never did go far enough and denounce the entire institutional church. But that leaves room for the new reformation.

  • Dr.Biswarup Goswami

    it is well written, but content does not satisfy me. more elaboration is needed.

  • Taylor Walker

    I have to do a paper on this and I feel this was really helpful.