Harvard Style Bibliography

By Feisty Ash
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Harvard Style Bibliography

Tips for Writing Bibliographies in Harvard Citation Style

At the end of every research paper and essay, you must have seen that there is a section of bibliography. It includes a list of all sources the scholar has used to create the content of his writing.

Universities and academic institutions all over the world lay much emphasis on bibliography and have made this section an obligatory part of the research paper. This is to ensure that the writer acknowledges other peoples work and do not claim someone else’s ideas and thoughts to be his own–it is unethical and falls within the domains of plagiarism.

There are generally four authentic referencing styles of which Harvard formatting style is highly honored. Although some you will find it complex but in fact it is not and once you get hang of it, it will become a piece of cake for you. The commonly used sources include books, journals/periodicals, newspapers, magazines, web casts etc.

Creating Bibliographies in Harvard Citation Style

Mentioned below are some rules of Harvard style which you will find helpful when creating the section of bibliography.

Bibliography Writing for Books in Harvard Style

For books—you need to write the surname and then the initials of the author (if more then one author is there, please arrange the names in alphabetical order), the year of its publication, title of the book in Italics, edition number, name of publisher and place of publication. Here’s an example—please carefully look at the punctuation marks, they’re really important.

Cole, GHA 1991, Thermal power cycles, Edward Arnold, London.

Journals, Magazines & Periodicals

For journals, magazines and periodicals— include the initials of author followed by his surname, publication year, title of paper/article, volume and issue number as well as the page numbers which you consulted. Look at this example to build a better understanding:

Culotta, E 2008, ‘Hobbit skull suggests a separate species’, Science Now, no. 677,p. 2.

Internet Articles

For Internet articles—mention the name of editor or writer, any update if applicable, title of the article, sponsor’s name, last date viewed and of course the URL. Write it this way:

McGarry, A 2008, ‘China’s pain fires Olympic dream’, Beijing blog, weblog post, 13 June, viewed 18 August 2008, <http://blogs.abc.net.au/olympics/>.

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Feisty Ash
The author is a freelance academic writer. She is also a full time blogger at Write A Writing and enthusiastically sharing her knowledge with the readers for over more than a year. With the help of her intellect and experience, Ayesha is an expert in playing with words. Reading, gardening, music, cooking and shopping are few of her spare time activities. She is a first class business graduate, married and enjoying a wonderful life with her husband and daughter.

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